June 8, 2021

Setting the Right Social Media Marketing Goals for Financial Services

Designing and implementing social media strategies for financial institutions takes an investment of time, effort, and money. How can marketers tell whether the return is worth the investment?

Many financial institutions look at vanity metrics to define their success on social media. Sure, this can show you how many likes, comments, and shares a post gets, but it doesn’t do much to prove a return on your investment. If you want to see real, measurable business results that go beyond farming and tracking likes and shares, you must focus on measuring and increasing conversion rates.

Social media can be much more than just a brand-building tool for financial institutions. If you’re interested in moving to the next level of social media, take the following steps to convert leads and collect data to measure your success along the way:

1. Woo followers with trust-building social content.

The first step in driving conversions from social media is to get your audience’s attention with valuable content. Not every piece of content will drive conversions directly, but material that provides value to readers and establishes your expertise will build a solid foundation for your social media strategy.

For example, local audience members would appreciate seeing content about how your financial institution is involved in the community. This is important content to share, but it doesn’t necessarily convert. Content that highlights your expertise and gets audiences interested in your services, however, is also an important part of your content foundation — and that material can provide a more direct line to conversion. A guidebook for first-time homebuyers, for instance, could spark a conversation between a follower and a loan officer.

The key is to encourage your employees to share such content on their own social media accounts. Audiences will be twice as likely to click on a post shared by an employee than by the larger brand profile as they’ll relate more to a human face than a big brand. When employees become brand ambassadors on social media, they set a stronger foundation for trust and relationship-building down the line.

2. Lead audiences to the next step in the digital journey with landing pages.

Next, your social media strategy should go beyond catching interest to leading readers back to your website for further engagement.

Build website landing pages to house the valuable content your associates highlight in their posts. For example, an employees’ social post could list one or two first steps in a guidebook for first-time homebuyers, then offer a link to the landing page to learn more. Once readers follow the link and land on your website, they can fill out a form with their name and email and get the guidebook download in return.

Tools exist to help even marketers with no website-building experience craft landing pages with ease. You’ll want to create one for each of your target audiences for a targeted approach. For example, you may want to reach young adults with the homebuying guidebook and older ones with a retirement planning one. The intent is to offer readers valuable, relevant content they want and need — and to gather their information in the process. That way, the sales team can reach out to engage leads who have already demonstrated interest and seen value from your brand.

3. Bring paid advertising into the fold to land in front of the right people.

You can’t have an effective social media strategy without a foundation of organic social media, but you also can’t really grow your brand without investing in paid ads. Social platforms have changed their algorithms over the years to limit the visibility of branded posts. Paid social media advertising, however, allows you to target posts to specific audience segments and cut through the noise to deliver content that feels relevant and personalized. For example, by putting some money behind your associates’ posts about the first-time homebuyer guide, you could ensure that those posts reach young adults in the area.

What’s more, you can retarget leads with paid social media advertising. If someone clicked a link from a social post to navigate to your landing page, downloaded the guidebook, but never responded to a follow-up email from the sales team, you could get ads in front of them on social to offer more valuable material and keep your brand top of mind. It can help you reengage audiences in the digital journey to get them one step closer to conversion.

Social media has changed considerably in the past 10 years. Make no mistake: It’s still an incredibly important tool to have in your marketing stack. You just need to reframe your social media strategy so you can more plainly tell what’s working and why. By balancing your vanity and conversion metrics, as well as the processes used to bump them up, you’ll be well on your way to winning more customers.

RESOURCES

LEARN
June 8, 2021

Setting the Right Social Media Marketing Goals for Financial Services

No items found.

Designing and implementing social media strategies for financial institutions takes an investment of time, effort, and money. How can marketers tell whether the return is worth the investment?

Many financial institutions look at vanity metrics to define their success on social media. Sure, this can show you how many likes, comments, and shares a post gets, but it doesn’t do much to prove a return on your investment. If you want to see real, measurable business results that go beyond farming and tracking likes and shares, you must focus on measuring and increasing conversion rates.

Social media can be much more than just a brand-building tool for financial institutions. If you’re interested in moving to the next level of social media, take the following steps to convert leads and collect data to measure your success along the way:

1. Woo followers with trust-building social content.

The first step in driving conversions from social media is to get your audience’s attention with valuable content. Not every piece of content will drive conversions directly, but material that provides value to readers and establishes your expertise will build a solid foundation for your social media strategy.

For example, local audience members would appreciate seeing content about how your financial institution is involved in the community. This is important content to share, but it doesn’t necessarily convert. Content that highlights your expertise and gets audiences interested in your services, however, is also an important part of your content foundation — and that material can provide a more direct line to conversion. A guidebook for first-time homebuyers, for instance, could spark a conversation between a follower and a loan officer.

The key is to encourage your employees to share such content on their own social media accounts. Audiences will be twice as likely to click on a post shared by an employee than by the larger brand profile as they’ll relate more to a human face than a big brand. When employees become brand ambassadors on social media, they set a stronger foundation for trust and relationship-building down the line.

2. Lead audiences to the next step in the digital journey with landing pages.

Next, your social media strategy should go beyond catching interest to leading readers back to your website for further engagement.

Build website landing pages to house the valuable content your associates highlight in their posts. For example, an employees’ social post could list one or two first steps in a guidebook for first-time homebuyers, then offer a link to the landing page to learn more. Once readers follow the link and land on your website, they can fill out a form with their name and email and get the guidebook download in return.

Tools exist to help even marketers with no website-building experience craft landing pages with ease. You’ll want to create one for each of your target audiences for a targeted approach. For example, you may want to reach young adults with the homebuying guidebook and older ones with a retirement planning one. The intent is to offer readers valuable, relevant content they want and need — and to gather their information in the process. That way, the sales team can reach out to engage leads who have already demonstrated interest and seen value from your brand.

3. Bring paid advertising into the fold to land in front of the right people.

You can’t have an effective social media strategy without a foundation of organic social media, but you also can’t really grow your brand without investing in paid ads. Social platforms have changed their algorithms over the years to limit the visibility of branded posts. Paid social media advertising, however, allows you to target posts to specific audience segments and cut through the noise to deliver content that feels relevant and personalized. For example, by putting some money behind your associates’ posts about the first-time homebuyer guide, you could ensure that those posts reach young adults in the area.

What’s more, you can retarget leads with paid social media advertising. If someone clicked a link from a social post to navigate to your landing page, downloaded the guidebook, but never responded to a follow-up email from the sales team, you could get ads in front of them on social to offer more valuable material and keep your brand top of mind. It can help you reengage audiences in the digital journey to get them one step closer to conversion.

Social media has changed considerably in the past 10 years. Make no mistake: It’s still an incredibly important tool to have in your marketing stack. You just need to reframe your social media strategy so you can more plainly tell what’s working and why. By balancing your vanity and conversion metrics, as well as the processes used to bump them up, you’ll be well on your way to winning more customers.

Subscribe to our newsletter and get the latest sent to your inbox.
Thank you for subscribing!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
SIMILAR POSTS:

Customer relationship-building is one of the greatest value drivers for insurance agents. A benchmark analysis from McKinsey & Co. found agents with deeper customer relationships have higher product density than those lacking in relationships — often cross-selling three or more products per customer.

With that in mind, it’s essential that agents understand how to best leverage their humanity and personality to truly connect with their audiences. In today’s age, this extends to how agents present themselves and connect online.

When prospective clients meet an agent for the first time, they’re asking themselves, “Is this person likable? Can I trust them?” Clients want to feel an authentic connection that gives them peace of mind and assures them that someone has their best interests at heart.

This desire for connection isn’t limited to the insurance industry. In fact, 88% of consumers say that authenticity is a key factor when deciding the brands they like and support, and that trust is vitally important to entering working relationships. That desire for trust grows exponentially when it comes to insurance sales because the business is built around protecting clients’ futures.

Insurance agents have a head start on this — their businesses have always been rooted in authenticity. But as digital transformation in the insurance industry continues, it’s more important than ever that agents assert themselves through authenticity on social media. It’s no different from what agents and other insurance professionals have been doing in person for years. It’s about conveying expertise, building trust, and showcasing industry knowledge — except now it’s within the digital universe. Social media provides a new platform for staying top of mind with customers and prospects alike.

So, how should agents be more authentic on social media? Same as they would offline — with relationships.

Good selling starts with genuinely listening to clients and being authentic, no matter what. Insurance agents are there to identify clients’ life needs and build a solution to protect them against loss. They must genuinely care about clients’ needs to find the right solutions and demonstrate that level of care to earn trust.

Here’s how agents can bring that energy to social media:

View social media as an opportunity to provide value. Marketers and agents alike already know that authenticity is important to customer acquisition. That same authenticity should show up in social media activity.

Agents should still be themselves, just on digital channels. After all, in the insurance business, agents are selling a promise that a consumer may or may not ever see delivery on. If the client never has an accident, they’ll never make a claim.

This means a lot of time can pass between a point of sale and delivery of promise.

With the rise of social media, however, there is a growing opportunity to deliver value in the long term. Whether it’s sharing thought-leadership articles, checking in with clients on social media, or providing digital tools to help educate clients, the digital landscape provides ample opportunity to reinforce proof of agent value on an ongoing basis. Including both paid and organic social media marketing for insurance agents in the mix of sales practices is critical.

This won’t replace traditional tools like phone, email and in-person meetings, but having a mix of organic and paid content alongside them will complement other relationship-building efforts, keep agents top of mind, and continually provide value to clients and prospects.

Lean into the power of real-life experience. There’s a good chance that agents live and work in the communities they serve. Agents should use that advantage with prospective clients when building their authentic brands. Showing on social media what’s happening in their communities and their offices will help foster a sense of belonging and drive interest among followers.

Need more marketing ideas for insurance agents? Look to everyday experiences. If an agent runs into someone at a local event, they should take a selfie and tag the person on Instagram, Facebook or LinkedIn. If a client drops off cookies, the agent should post a photo and a heartfelt message about what it meant to the team. Social media followers will connect with those real-life moments far more than they would with a branded post.

Embrace storytelling. Too often, social media marketing for insurance agents consists only of market statistics or limited-time promotions. While this type of content can absolutely be useful and helpful, it’s not enough on its own. Think about the brands you follow: Would statistics and discounts be enough to get you engaged?

Social media is about creating a narrative, not just posting facts or promotions.

Agents should share the true picture of what it’s been like to grow a practice. Tell client stories about how they’ve benefited from your insurance products (with permission and privacy in mind, of course). When agents share authentically, they build trust with clients and prospects.

Be themselves. If agents are only professional and stuffy, audiences won’t connect. Agents and marketers alike shouldn’t be afraid to let a little personality shine through on social media. Thought leadership can create credibility and demonstrate expertise, and it’s always better received when served up by a real-life person.

That’s what social selling is all about.

Posting is only one part of the strategy. Agents should also comment on and engage with clients’ posts as appropriate. Two-way communication is critical to building authenticity. Think about it as if you were having an in-person conversation; there would be plenty of back-and-forth throughout the discussion. Did a client become a grandparent? Their agent should congratulate them. Social selling is all about creating conversation, just like in real life.

Engagement provides the added benefit of personalization. Customers don’t want to feel like marketing collateral. When agents engage with them honestly and authentically, they’re well on their way to creating deep, lasting consumer relationships.

Building authenticity through social media is similar in principle to building authenticity in real life; it’s just using a different medium to do so. When intermediaries share personal stories and helpful content with clients in a way that reflects their true personalities, they’ll build lasting relationships both online and offline that will serve as the foundation of future sales.

*This article was originally published in Insurance Journal.

Make the most of your social media presence by optimizing your images and including essential information about your business on each platform. By giving your customers an optimal digital experience, you will be able to broaden your reach and provide better customer service through your digital platforms.

Facebook

IMAGE SIZING:

Profile picture: 170 x 170px (desktop), 128 x 128px (smartphones)

Cover photo: 820 x 312px (desktop), 640 x 360px (smartphones)

Keep the main content of your image centered. On a desktop the photo will display as 840x312px, but on mobile will size down to 640x360px.

Facebook post image: 1200 x 630px

The ideal width for a Facebook post image is 1200px, but height can vary based on what type of device the image display is optimized for. We recommend keeping it at the recommended size to keep consistency on all devices.

When creating a Facebook Ad graphic, any text should not take up more than 20% of the photo. You can find a cheat sheet here: https://www.facebook.com/ads/tools/text_overlay.

Facebook Video: 1280 x 720px

The optimal length for a short-form video on Facebook is 15 seconds to 1 minute; for a long-form video, it is 3 minutes. The maximum file size is 10GB.

Facebook Link Image: 1200 x 630px

Make sure to claim ownership of your links for the ability to change the link preview photo. You can find more info on that here: https://www.facebook.com/business/help/528858287471922?id=708699556338610.

Carousel Post: 1080 x 1080px

Carousel posts are a great way to display multiple services or features that you offer to your customers. When placing a Facebook ad you can link each carousel photo to a different link, making it easy for people to navigate to your specific products.

Facebook Story: 1080 x 1920px

Make the most of your stories by using all of your space and creating a fullscreen experience.

IMPORTANT PAGE INFORMATION:

Page name:

This is where you can name your Facebook Page, but be sure to keep it shorter than 75 characters.

Page username:

Customize your page URL by adding a username, making it easier for people to locate and navigate people from other digital platforms. Your Facebook URL can include up to 50 characters.

Page call to action:

Facebook gives you a variety of choices on calls to action. For example, if you’d like customers to contact you by email, you can set up a “Send Email” button with your email address connected and ready to go.

LinkedIn

IMAGE SIZING:

Profile picture: 400 x 400px

Upload your business logo here to personalize your profile. If this page is for an individual, this is where you will upload their headshot.

Cover Photo: 1584 x 396px

Having a personalized business cover photo will make your profile look more professional and give you the opportunity to provide page visitors with more of the look and feel of your business. This can include an image related to your business or a graphic with information on services you provide or your business slogan.

LinkedIn post photo: 1200 x 628px (mobile), 1200 x 1200px (desktop)

When targeting an audience on both desktop and mobile, make sure that you optimize for mobile to give people the best experience.

LinkedIn Link Photo: 1200 x 628px (mobile), 1200 x 1200px (desktop)

Providing an image with your link preview can help give viewers a better idea of article content and also communicate your brand look and feel.

LinkedIn Link Video: 4096 x 2304px maximum, 256 x 144 pixels minimum

The optimal video length for LinkedIn is 30-90 seconds and the maximum file size is 5GB.

IMPORTANT PAGE INFORMATION

Page name:

This is where your business name is located, as well as your company industry, location, and number of followers.

Page description:

Add your business slogan, mission, or a short description that tells people what your company, products, and services can do for them.

Twitter

IMAGE SIZING

Profile picture: 400 x 400px

Upload your business logo or headshot to personalize your profile.

Cover photo: 1500 x 500px

Be sure to center your content to give your followers an optimized experience on mobile.

Twitter post photo: 1200 x 675px

Allow your followers to see the entirety of the photo in their feed by adhering to this sizing guideline. The maximum file size is 5MB.

Twitter video: 1280 x 720px (desktop, recommended), 720 x 720px (mobile)

The optimal video length for Twitter is 20-45 seconds and the maximum file size is 512MB.

IMPORTANT PAGE INFORMATION

Underneath your profile photo, your company name and username will be displayed.

Write a short bio to tell people more about your business.

Instagram

IMAGE SIZING

Profile photo: 110 x 110px

Your profile picture will be small, so be sure your image is sized correctly and centered. This is a great place for your company logo.

Profile thumbnail: Displays as 161 x 161px

This is a preview of your large image post, but looks best when the photo posted is square.

Highlight Cover: 1080 x 1920px

Your cover photos should have centered images to give your highlight reel a balanced look. You can also name your highlights, but be concise as they can only be 15 characters long.

Instagram Feed Photo: 1080 x 1080px (square), 1080 x 1350 (portrait), 1080 x 566 (landscape)

The recommended width for all Instagram feed photos is 1080px, but the height can vary. To optimize for your feed display within your profile, we recommend using the sizing listed above to keep your image square.

Instagram Feed Video:  1080 x 1080px (square), 1080 x 1350 (portrait), 1080 x 566 (landscape)

The optimal length for an Instagram video is 30-60 seconds and the max file size is 650MB.

Instagram Feed Ad Photo: 1080 x 1080px

Your ad photo will display the same as a normal feed photo, but with a link attached. When creating an ad in Ads Manager, you’ll be able to upload a separate photo for Instagram to keep your photos optimized for the user experience.

Instagram Story: 1080 x 1920px (portrait), 1080 x 601 (landscape)

Make the most of your stories by using all of your space and creating a fullscreen experience. The maximum length of the story is 15 seconds.

Instagram Reels & Live: 1080 x 1920px

Reels can be used to offer tutorials, demos, or service features. These will be saved under your profile page for viewers to go back and watch at their leisure. The maximum length for Reels is 30 seconds. For Live, this can be used for announcements, events, or other Q&A sessions. These can also be saved for later viewing, and can last up to 4 hours.

BOK Financial is a financial services partner for consumers, businesses and wealth clients with more than 150 users on the Denim Social platform.

In addition to building brand credibility and establishing loan officer expertise, Denim Social enables their mortgage loan officers to cultivate relationships in social media and organically source leads.

Personal relationships are the bedrock of the financial advice industry. Nearly 75 percent of investors prioritize personal relationships when evaluating investment providers, Deloitte found. That’s why providers—even online brokers and robo-advisory firms—are taking care to preserve the human touch. Even with a growing trend toward digital automation to streamline trades and more, human connection is still paramount.

Bank marketers should reflect that by personalizing the digital experiences that they create for wealth management clients and prospects. Investors are accustomed to receiving personalized content online, including from their favorite retailers. They expect the same levels of customization from their service providers.

The benefits of customer personalization are mutual for investors and banks. When customers receive content tailored to their needs and financial situations, they understand their investment opportunities better and feel empowered to make the right financial decisions. And when they see wealth advisors addressing their specific needs—such as estate, retirement or education planning—they will naturally feel like those advisors understand their needs and can help them.

By contrast, when banks and advisors neglect personalization, they risk what Bain and Company calls “hidden defection,” or customers buying high-margin products such as loans, investments, and credit cards from competitors. Even if investors do not leave, they will go elsewhere to place their investments and purchase new financial products. Many customers who defect are attracted by personalized direct offers. That said, almost 80 percent of customers surveyed by Bain said they would have bought from their primary financial institutions if the banks had made equivalent offers.

It is clear that by creating improved digital experiences, banks can retain their clients’ business and even gain wallet share. So, how can they adjust their bank marketing strategies to prioritize customer personalization and build relationships?

1. Embrace a social selling strategy.

Whether financial advisors like it or not, their digital profiles affect how prospects view them. Almost 50 percent of investors say social media impacts whom they hire as a financial professional. And 33 percent report they seek financial advice online, according to Financial Advisor reporting on a Hartford Funds survey. Wealth advisors need to use social media to build rapport (and trust) with clients and prospects. When they demonstrate their value routinely, they’re more likely to be top of mind when customers are ready to purchase. That’s how strong digital profiles lay the foundation for social selling.

Social selling adheres to the same core principles as in-person selling: building relationships with customers, demonstrating knowledge, educating them and helping solve their problems. It all just happens online. Social selling empowers financial advisors to add value for customers through digital means when they wouldn’t have had the opportunity otherwise. Ultimately, sales reps who regularly share content are 45% more likely to exceed their quotas. So it is worth wealth advisors’ time to beef up their social profiles and engage with contacts.

2. Join customers on their preferred channels.

Investors are getting their information somewhere. it is essential to find out where that information comes from and to meet investors where they are.

Then, financial advisors should create profiles on those channels and organically engage with prospective clients. Why? Twenty percent of investors told Hartford Funds that a wealth advisor’s social media was their sole deciding factor when evaluating a financial professional.

For older investors, this might be traditional news channels’ Twitter or Facebook feeds. For younger investors, this could be newer channels such as TikTok. More than one-third of Gen Z Americans say they get financial advice from TikTok, and only 24 percent of investors in this age group get advice from financial advisors, according to a recent Vericast survey. That represents a big opportunity for financial advisors to win young investors’ business by meeting them through these channels. The key is to make any engagement enjoyable and authentic so that clients don’t feel like financial advisors are just trying to sell to them.

3. Create connected customer journeys.

Posting on social media is a great start, but if bank marketers want to drive ROI, they must create more robust digital journeys. The key to connected investor journeys is to avoid digital dead ends and always offer clear next steps.

At the start of the journey, wealth advisors must interact and create two-way dialogue online with existing audiences. They should then expand their audiences through tactics such as paid social media advertising, which can help them reach investors similar to their current customers or new target audiences.

In their social posts, financial advisors can drive audiences to content-driven landing pages that contain resources to download in exchange for contact information, which can help capture leads. Every step of the way, investors need to see the value, whether through educational content that wealth advisors share, access to more in-depth resources or complimentary consultations.

Banks benefit when they embrace customer personalization in their marketing strategies to keep customers engaged, build rapport and ultimately close more sales. That starts with giving wealth advisors access to the right processes and technology to deliver personalized education and offers. Once properly empowered, advisors can meet clients where they are, establish themselves as trustworthy, generate more leads and reduce the risk of “hidden defection” over time.

This article was originally published in ABA Bank Marketing.

Smart financial marketers know social media and social selling are essential  to effectively reach and build trust with today’s consumers. But how does your digital marketing strategy measure up against competitors?

Denim Social is here to help. We collected social media data from 177 institutions across banking, mortgage, wealth management and insurance to help you get the pulse on the social media performance. Take a look and see how your institution stacks up.

Ready to learn how you can adopt these trends? Book a demo to learn more.

The power of social media is undeniable. The ability of banks to engage with and influence customers and prospects via digital channels is essential to modern marketing strategies. Gone are the days when it was “nice to have” a presence on platforms such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Instagram. Today, these pathways are helping banks to build relationships that were historically cultivated by tirelessly walking up and down Main Street, shaking hands and leaving behind business cards.

Unsurprisingly, the vast majority of banks are active on social media, and at least 7 in 10 have been for five or more years. Banks understand that engaging on social media is table stakes. They have to be there, but how they do it will vary. Being active and being effective are often two separate things. A key question for banks today is how to move beyond using social media to promote and strengthen their brand, and harness these platforms to foster sales.

In this case study, Denim Social and American Bankers Association show how banks are using social media to ramp up digital engagement and build sales. Download your copy here.

Connect & Convert on Social

Successfully scale conversion optimized campaigns across all social media channels with built-in compliance, publishing tools, and more.
Book a Demo
GUIDES

Setting the Right Social Media Marketing Goals for Financial Services

Designing and implementing social media strategies for financial institutions takes an investment of time, effort, and money. How can marketers tell whether the return is worth the investment?

Many financial institutions look at vanity metrics to define their success on social media. Sure, this can show you how many likes, comments, and shares a post gets, but it doesn’t do much to prove a return on your investment. If you want to see real, measurable business results that go beyond farming and tracking likes and shares, you must focus on measuring and increasing conversion rates.

Social media can be much more than just a brand-building tool for financial institutions. If you’re interested in moving to the next level of social media, take the following steps to convert leads and collect data to measure your success along the way:

1. Woo followers with trust-building social content.

The first step in driving conversions from social media is to get your audience’s attention with valuable content. Not every piece of content will drive conversions directly, but material that provides value to readers and establishes your expertise will build a solid foundation for your social media strategy.

For example, local audience members would appreciate seeing content about how your financial institution is involved in the community. This is important content to share, but it doesn’t necessarily convert. Content that highlights your expertise and gets audiences interested in your services, however, is also an important part of your content foundation — and that material can provide a more direct line to conversion. A guidebook for first-time homebuyers, for instance, could spark a conversation between a follower and a loan officer.

The key is to encourage your employees to share such content on their own social media accounts. Audiences will be twice as likely to click on a post shared by an employee than by the larger brand profile as they’ll relate more to a human face than a big brand. When employees become brand ambassadors on social media, they set a stronger foundation for trust and relationship-building down the line.

2. Lead audiences to the next step in the digital journey with landing pages.

Next, your social media strategy should go beyond catching interest to leading readers back to your website for further engagement.

Build website landing pages to house the valuable content your associates highlight in their posts. For example, an employees’ social post could list one or two first steps in a guidebook for first-time homebuyers, then offer a link to the landing page to learn more. Once readers follow the link and land on your website, they can fill out a form with their name and email and get the guidebook download in return.

Tools exist to help even marketers with no website-building experience craft landing pages with ease. You’ll want to create one for each of your target audiences for a targeted approach. For example, you may want to reach young adults with the homebuying guidebook and older ones with a retirement planning one. The intent is to offer readers valuable, relevant content they want and need — and to gather their information in the process. That way, the sales team can reach out to engage leads who have already demonstrated interest and seen value from your brand.

3. Bring paid advertising into the fold to land in front of the right people.

You can’t have an effective social media strategy without a foundation of organic social media, but you also can’t really grow your brand without investing in paid ads. Social platforms have changed their algorithms over the years to limit the visibility of branded posts. Paid social media advertising, however, allows you to target posts to specific audience segments and cut through the noise to deliver content that feels relevant and personalized. For example, by putting some money behind your associates’ posts about the first-time homebuyer guide, you could ensure that those posts reach young adults in the area.

What’s more, you can retarget leads with paid social media advertising. If someone clicked a link from a social post to navigate to your landing page, downloaded the guidebook, but never responded to a follow-up email from the sales team, you could get ads in front of them on social to offer more valuable material and keep your brand top of mind. It can help you reengage audiences in the digital journey to get them one step closer to conversion.

Social media has changed considerably in the past 10 years. Make no mistake: It’s still an incredibly important tool to have in your marketing stack. You just need to reframe your social media strategy so you can more plainly tell what’s working and why. By balancing your vanity and conversion metrics, as well as the processes used to bump them up, you’ll be well on your way to winning more customers.

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Download Guide
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
ALL GUIDES:

BOK Financial is a financial services partner for consumers, businesses and wealth clients with more than 150 users on the Denim Social platform.

In addition to building brand credibility and establishing loan officer expertise, Denim Social enables their mortgage loan officers to cultivate relationships in social media and organically source leads.

As financial marketers look to the coming year, most are wondering, “what’s next?” While no one can say for sure, our team of experts here at Denim Social are keeping a pulse on what’s new in digital marketing for financial institutions on social media. This guide will not only educate you on the latest trends, but help you make the case for increased investment in social selling and digital marketing strategies at your institution.

Whether you’re in banking, wealth management, insurance or mortgage, relationships are the bedrock of your business.

Considering clients in these industries are handing over the keys to their personal kingdoms, it’s no surprise that trust and connection matter. That’s why successful sales strategies for these industries are focused on building long-term, trusted relationships.

To truly unleash the potential of social, financial institutions need to use social media as a sales tool. It’s called social selling and it works.

The power of social media is undeniable. The ability of banks to engage with and influence customers and prospects via interactive digital channels is an essential tool and a cornerstone of marketing. Gone are the days when it was “nice to have” a presence on platforms such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Instagram. Today, these pathways are helping banks to build relationships that were historically cultivated by tirelessly walking up and down Main Street, shaking hands and leaving behind business cards.

In this case study by Denim Social and American Bankers Association, we take a look at how banks are using social media to ramp up digital engagement and build sales.

As any marketer worth their salt will tell you, analytics should drive your social strategy. The key to success is understanding how to link social media efforts to ROI metrics. Read this guide to learn how to gain insights that matter, optimize your strategy and prove your social success.

It’s no surprise that social media can help drive results for your mortgage business. In fact, the question for most marketers at mortgage lending institutions isn’t IF they should be doing more social media marketing - it’s HOW. Download to learn how to:

  • Scale your social selling program
  • Plan your content strategy
  • Train your loan officers

AnnieMac is one of the fastest-growing mortgage loan providers in the U.S., serving clients in 42 states. Learn how Denim Social helped their team to streamline its brand’s social media strategy and activate social selling for hundreds of loan officers in just four months.

Instant Download

Find out how more than 400 financial institutions across asset classes, geographies, and more used social media in 2020 to effectively support their business objectives. We’ve also outlined key trends to inform your social media future.

As mortgage demand surges to historic highs, home purchase and refinance markets remain hot. This is excellent news for loan officers, but it also means the environment is more competitive than ever.

So how can marketers ensure that their loan officers stand out? The answer is social media.

Read this guidebook from Denim Social to learn how you can help your loan officers build strong relationships, stand out from the crowd and win more business using social media.

Every Mortgage Marketer Should Ask Themselves

Compliance is complicated, but don’t let it stop your lending team from making the most of social media. Think you’re ready to start social selling? Ask yourself these five questions!

Download this guidebook to learn how marketers are using social media to:

  • Drive business with the lowest digital spend compared to traditional media
  • Position employees as thought-leaders while leveraging their collective reach of their social media presence
  • Ultimately, build trust with their communities and customers that translates to positive business results

Read this guide if you’re asking yourself:

  • Is my social media policy current and comprehensive?
  • How do I ensure social media compliance during M&A?
  • What do I need to consider for direct messaging compliance?

In this guide we will help you think about your all important social media policy and thoughtfully consider how changes in social media tech and even your bank’s structure may impact compliance.

Download this guidebook to learn how marketers are using social media to:

  • Drive business with the lowest digital spend compared to traditional media
  • Position employees as thought-leaders while leveraging their collective reach of their social media presence
  • Ultimately, build trust with their communities and customers that translates to positive business results

Every Financial Services Marketer Should Ask Themselves

Compliance is complicated, but don’t let it stop your lending team from making the most of social media. Think you’re ready to start social selling? Ask yourself these five questions!

Stronger Customer Relationships on Instagram

Financial Services companies should be marketing and advertising on Instagram. We break down why, and help you create a strategy to reach new customers- while continuing to build trust in your brand.

How 6 Financial Marketers Are Creating Value in Social Media

Ever wonder what everyone else is doing in social media? We talked to six leading financial marketers about how they’re succeeding today and planning for the next big thing.

Get their insights on strengthening your social strategies, unlocking the power of employee networks and creating next-level content that drives engagement.

Download this guidebook to learn how 3 mortgage lenders are using social media to:

  • Position themselves in a place the community is already looking ... their social media
  • Empower loan officers to engage in local conversations
  • Turn their institution's loan officers into the voice of their brand
  • Build trust within the community

Which roles do you fill when building your bank's marketing dream team? This guide will show you the following:

  • Who does what
  • The right structure to execute strategy
  • How compliance software can help

Enjoy!

Download this guidebook to learn how marketers are using social media to:

  • Drive business with the lowest digital spend compared to traditional media
  • Position employees as thought-leaders while leveraging their collective reach of their social media presence
  • Ultimately, build trust with their communities and customers that translates to positive business results

ABA Study: The Current State of Social Media

See what nearly 430 bank marketers had to say when asked questions such as:

  • Is it important to equip your sales personnel with social media accounts?
  • Does your bank measure the impact of your social media use?
  • COVID-19 & Bank Social Media

    Times are different and how you connect with customers and potential customers has changed drastically. In a socially distant world, learn to still build lasting relationships.

    Download and learn the guiding principles for using social media to serve both your customers and communities in the midst of a pandemic.

    Evolve Bank & Trust (“Evolve”) is an $700M+ asset institution with nearly 40 Home Loan Centers (HLC) and nearly 500 employees nationwide. See how Denim Social helped Evolve activate Home Loan Center Facebook pages over the course of just a few months.

    Download Here
    GUIDES

    Setting the Right Social Media Marketing Goals for Financial Services

    Designing and implementing social media strategies for financial institutions takes an investment of time, effort, and money. How can marketers tell whether the return is worth the investment?

    Many financial institutions look at vanity metrics to define their success on social media. Sure, this can show you how many likes, comments, and shares a post gets, but it doesn’t do much to prove a return on your investment. If you want to see real, measurable business results that go beyond farming and tracking likes and shares, you must focus on measuring and increasing conversion rates.

    Social media can be much more than just a brand-building tool for financial institutions. If you’re interested in moving to the next level of social media, take the following steps to convert leads and collect data to measure your success along the way:

    1. Woo followers with trust-building social content.

    The first step in driving conversions from social media is to get your audience’s attention with valuable content. Not every piece of content will drive conversions directly, but material that provides value to readers and establishes your expertise will build a solid foundation for your social media strategy.

    For example, local audience members would appreciate seeing content about how your financial institution is involved in the community. This is important content to share, but it doesn’t necessarily convert. Content that highlights your expertise and gets audiences interested in your services, however, is also an important part of your content foundation — and that material can provide a more direct line to conversion. A guidebook for first-time homebuyers, for instance, could spark a conversation between a follower and a loan officer.

    The key is to encourage your employees to share such content on their own social media accounts. Audiences will be twice as likely to click on a post shared by an employee than by the larger brand profile as they’ll relate more to a human face than a big brand. When employees become brand ambassadors on social media, they set a stronger foundation for trust and relationship-building down the line.

    2. Lead audiences to the next step in the digital journey with landing pages.

    Next, your social media strategy should go beyond catching interest to leading readers back to your website for further engagement.

    Build website landing pages to house the valuable content your associates highlight in their posts. For example, an employees’ social post could list one or two first steps in a guidebook for first-time homebuyers, then offer a link to the landing page to learn more. Once readers follow the link and land on your website, they can fill out a form with their name and email and get the guidebook download in return.

    Tools exist to help even marketers with no website-building experience craft landing pages with ease. You’ll want to create one for each of your target audiences for a targeted approach. For example, you may want to reach young adults with the homebuying guidebook and older ones with a retirement planning one. The intent is to offer readers valuable, relevant content they want and need — and to gather their information in the process. That way, the sales team can reach out to engage leads who have already demonstrated interest and seen value from your brand.

    3. Bring paid advertising into the fold to land in front of the right people.

    You can’t have an effective social media strategy without a foundation of organic social media, but you also can’t really grow your brand without investing in paid ads. Social platforms have changed their algorithms over the years to limit the visibility of branded posts. Paid social media advertising, however, allows you to target posts to specific audience segments and cut through the noise to deliver content that feels relevant and personalized. For example, by putting some money behind your associates’ posts about the first-time homebuyer guide, you could ensure that those posts reach young adults in the area.

    What’s more, you can retarget leads with paid social media advertising. If someone clicked a link from a social post to navigate to your landing page, downloaded the guidebook, but never responded to a follow-up email from the sales team, you could get ads in front of them on social to offer more valuable material and keep your brand top of mind. It can help you reengage audiences in the digital journey to get them one step closer to conversion.

    Social media has changed considerably in the past 10 years. Make no mistake: It’s still an incredibly important tool to have in your marketing stack. You just need to reframe your social media strategy so you can more plainly tell what’s working and why. By balancing your vanity and conversion metrics, as well as the processes used to bump them up, you’ll be well on your way to winning more customers.

    Download the Guide

    Thank you! Your submission has been received!
    Download Guide
    Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
    Download Guide
    ALL GUIDES:

    BOK Financial is a financial services partner for consumers, businesses and wealth clients with more than 150 users on the Denim Social platform.

    In addition to building brand credibility and establishing loan officer expertise, Denim Social enables their mortgage loan officers to cultivate relationships in social media and organically source leads.

    As financial marketers look to the coming year, most are wondering, “what’s next?” While no one can say for sure, our team of experts here at Denim Social are keeping a pulse on what’s new in digital marketing for financial institutions on social media. This guide will not only educate you on the latest trends, but help you make the case for increased investment in social selling and digital marketing strategies at your institution.

    Whether you’re in banking, wealth management, insurance or mortgage, relationships are the bedrock of your business.

    Considering clients in these industries are handing over the keys to their personal kingdoms, it’s no surprise that trust and connection matter. That’s why successful sales strategies for these industries are focused on building long-term, trusted relationships.

    To truly unleash the potential of social, financial institutions need to use social media as a sales tool. It’s called social selling and it works.

    The power of social media is undeniable. The ability of banks to engage with and influence customers and prospects via interactive digital channels is an essential tool and a cornerstone of marketing. Gone are the days when it was “nice to have” a presence on platforms such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Instagram. Today, these pathways are helping banks to build relationships that were historically cultivated by tirelessly walking up and down Main Street, shaking hands and leaving behind business cards.

    In this case study by Denim Social and American Bankers Association, we take a look at how banks are using social media to ramp up digital engagement and build sales.

    As any marketer worth their salt will tell you, analytics should drive your social strategy. The key to success is understanding how to link social media efforts to ROI metrics. Read this guide to learn how to gain insights that matter, optimize your strategy and prove your social success.

    It’s no surprise that social media can help drive results for your mortgage business. In fact, the question for most marketers at mortgage lending institutions isn’t IF they should be doing more social media marketing - it’s HOW. Download to learn how to:

    • Scale your social selling program
    • Plan your content strategy
    • Train your loan officers

    AnnieMac is one of the fastest-growing mortgage loan providers in the U.S., serving clients in 42 states. Learn how Denim Social helped their team to streamline its brand’s social media strategy and activate social selling for hundreds of loan officers in just four months.

    Instant Download

    Find out how more than 400 financial institutions across asset classes, geographies, and more used social media in 2020 to effectively support their business objectives. We’ve also outlined key trends to inform your social media future.

    As mortgage demand surges to historic highs, home purchase and refinance markets remain hot. This is excellent news for loan officers, but it also means the environment is more competitive than ever.

    So how can marketers ensure that their loan officers stand out? The answer is social media.

    Read this guidebook from Denim Social to learn how you can help your loan officers build strong relationships, stand out from the crowd and win more business using social media.

    Every Mortgage Marketer Should Ask Themselves

    Compliance is complicated, but don’t let it stop your lending team from making the most of social media. Think you’re ready to start social selling? Ask yourself these five questions!

    Download this guidebook to learn how marketers are using social media to:

    • Drive business with the lowest digital spend compared to traditional media
    • Position employees as thought-leaders while leveraging their collective reach of their social media presence
    • Ultimately, build trust with their communities and customers that translates to positive business results

    Read this guide if you’re asking yourself:

    • Is my social media policy current and comprehensive?
    • How do I ensure social media compliance during M&A?
    • What do I need to consider for direct messaging compliance?

    In this guide we will help you think about your all important social media policy and thoughtfully consider how changes in social media tech and even your bank’s structure may impact compliance.

    Download this guidebook to learn how marketers are using social media to:

    • Drive business with the lowest digital spend compared to traditional media
    • Position employees as thought-leaders while leveraging their collective reach of their social media presence
    • Ultimately, build trust with their communities and customers that translates to positive business results

    Every Financial Services Marketer Should Ask Themselves

    Compliance is complicated, but don’t let it stop your lending team from making the most of social media. Think you’re ready to start social selling? Ask yourself these five questions!

    Stronger Customer Relationships on Instagram

    Financial Services companies should be marketing and advertising on Instagram. We break down why, and help you create a strategy to reach new customers- while continuing to build trust in your brand.

    How 6 Financial Marketers Are Creating Value in Social Media

    Ever wonder what everyone else is doing in social media? We talked to six leading financial marketers about how they’re succeeding today and planning for the next big thing.

    Get their insights on strengthening your social strategies, unlocking the power of employee networks and creating next-level content that drives engagement.

    Download this guidebook to learn how 3 mortgage lenders are using social media to:

    • Position themselves in a place the community is already looking ... their social media
    • Empower loan officers to engage in local conversations
    • Turn their institution's loan officers into the voice of their brand
    • Build trust within the community

    Which roles do you fill when building your bank's marketing dream team? This guide will show you the following:

    • Who does what
    • The right structure to execute strategy
    • How compliance software can help

    Enjoy!

    Download this guidebook to learn how marketers are using social media to:

    • Drive business with the lowest digital spend compared to traditional media
    • Position employees as thought-leaders while leveraging their collective reach of their social media presence
    • Ultimately, build trust with their communities and customers that translates to positive business results

    ABA Study: The Current State of Social Media

    See what nearly 430 bank marketers had to say when asked questions such as:

  • Is it important to equip your sales personnel with social media accounts?
  • Does your bank measure the impact of your social media use?
  • COVID-19 & Bank Social Media

    Times are different and how you connect with customers and potential customers has changed drastically. In a socially distant world, learn to still build lasting relationships.

    Download and learn the guiding principles for using social media to serve both your customers and communities in the midst of a pandemic.

    Evolve Bank & Trust (“Evolve”) is an $700M+ asset institution with nearly 40 Home Loan Centers (HLC) and nearly 500 employees nationwide. See how Denim Social helped Evolve activate Home Loan Center Facebook pages over the course of just a few months.

    Download Here
    GUIDES

    Setting the Right Social Media Marketing Goals for Financial Services

    Designing and implementing social media strategies for financial institutions takes an investment of time, effort, and money. How can marketers tell whether the return is worth the investment?

    Many financial institutions look at vanity metrics to define their success on social media. Sure, this can show you how many likes, comments, and shares a post gets, but it doesn’t do much to prove a return on your investment. If you want to see real, measurable business results that go beyond farming and tracking likes and shares, you must focus on measuring and increasing conversion rates.

    Social media can be much more than just a brand-building tool for financial institutions. If you’re interested in moving to the next level of social media, take the following steps to convert leads and collect data to measure your success along the way:

    1. Woo followers with trust-building social content.

    The first step in driving conversions from social media is to get your audience’s attention with valuable content. Not every piece of content will drive conversions directly, but material that provides value to readers and establishes your expertise will build a solid foundation for your social media strategy.

    For example, local audience members would appreciate seeing content about how your financial institution is involved in the community. This is important content to share, but it doesn’t necessarily convert. Content that highlights your expertise and gets audiences interested in your services, however, is also an important part of your content foundation — and that material can provide a more direct line to conversion. A guidebook for first-time homebuyers, for instance, could spark a conversation between a follower and a loan officer.

    The key is to encourage your employees to share such content on their own social media accounts. Audiences will be twice as likely to click on a post shared by an employee than by the larger brand profile as they’ll relate more to a human face than a big brand. When employees become brand ambassadors on social media, they set a stronger foundation for trust and relationship-building down the line.

    2. Lead audiences to the next step in the digital journey with landing pages.

    Next, your social media strategy should go beyond catching interest to leading readers back to your website for further engagement.

    Build website landing pages to house the valuable content your associates highlight in their posts. For example, an employees’ social post could list one or two first steps in a guidebook for first-time homebuyers, then offer a link to the landing page to learn more. Once readers follow the link and land on your website, they can fill out a form with their name and email and get the guidebook download in return.

    Tools exist to help even marketers with no website-building experience craft landing pages with ease. You’ll want to create one for each of your target audiences for a targeted approach. For example, you may want to reach young adults with the homebuying guidebook and older ones with a retirement planning one. The intent is to offer readers valuable, relevant content they want and need — and to gather their information in the process. That way, the sales team can reach out to engage leads who have already demonstrated interest and seen value from your brand.

    3. Bring paid advertising into the fold to land in front of the right people.

    You can’t have an effective social media strategy without a foundation of organic social media, but you also can’t really grow your brand without investing in paid ads. Social platforms have changed their algorithms over the years to limit the visibility of branded posts. Paid social media advertising, however, allows you to target posts to specific audience segments and cut through the noise to deliver content that feels relevant and personalized. For example, by putting some money behind your associates’ posts about the first-time homebuyer guide, you could ensure that those posts reach young adults in the area.

    What’s more, you can retarget leads with paid social media advertising. If someone clicked a link from a social post to navigate to your landing page, downloaded the guidebook, but never responded to a follow-up email from the sales team, you could get ads in front of them on social to offer more valuable material and keep your brand top of mind. It can help you reengage audiences in the digital journey to get them one step closer to conversion.

    Social media has changed considerably in the past 10 years. Make no mistake: It’s still an incredibly important tool to have in your marketing stack. You just need to reframe your social media strategy so you can more plainly tell what’s working and why. By balancing your vanity and conversion metrics, as well as the processes used to bump them up, you’ll be well on your way to winning more customers.

    Download the Guide

    Thank you! Your submission has been received!
    Download Guide
    Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
    Download Guide
    ALL GUIDES:

    BOK Financial is a financial services partner for consumers, businesses and wealth clients with more than 150 users on the Denim Social platform.

    In addition to building brand credibility and establishing loan officer expertise, Denim Social enables their mortgage loan officers to cultivate relationships in social media and organically source leads.

    As financial marketers look to the coming year, most are wondering, “what’s next?” While no one can say for sure, our team of experts here at Denim Social are keeping a pulse on what’s new in digital marketing for financial institutions on social media. This guide will not only educate you on the latest trends, but help you make the case for increased investment in social selling and digital marketing strategies at your institution.

    Whether you’re in banking, wealth management, insurance or mortgage, relationships are the bedrock of your business.

    Considering clients in these industries are handing over the keys to their personal kingdoms, it’s no surprise that trust and connection matter. That’s why successful sales strategies for these industries are focused on building long-term, trusted relationships.

    To truly unleash the potential of social, financial institutions need to use social media as a sales tool. It’s called social selling and it works.

    The power of social media is undeniable. The ability of banks to engage with and influence customers and prospects via interactive digital channels is an essential tool and a cornerstone of marketing. Gone are the days when it was “nice to have” a presence on platforms such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Instagram. Today, these pathways are helping banks to build relationships that were historically cultivated by tirelessly walking up and down Main Street, shaking hands and leaving behind business cards.

    In this case study by Denim Social and American Bankers Association, we take a look at how banks are using social media to ramp up digital engagement and build sales.

    As any marketer worth their salt will tell you, analytics should drive your social strategy. The key to success is understanding how to link social media efforts to ROI metrics. Read this guide to learn how to gain insights that matter, optimize your strategy and prove your social success.

    It’s no surprise that social media can help drive results for your mortgage business. In fact, the question for most marketers at mortgage lending institutions isn’t IF they should be doing more social media marketing - it’s HOW. Download to learn how to:

    • Scale your social selling program
    • Plan your content strategy
    • Train your loan officers

    AnnieMac is one of the fastest-growing mortgage loan providers in the U.S., serving clients in 42 states. Learn how Denim Social helped their team to streamline its brand’s social media strategy and activate social selling for hundreds of loan officers in just four months.

    Instant Download

    Find out how more than 400 financial institutions across asset classes, geographies, and more used social media in 2020 to effectively support their business objectives. We’ve also outlined key trends to inform your social media future.

    As mortgage demand surges to historic highs, home purchase and refinance markets remain hot. This is excellent news for loan officers, but it also means the environment is more competitive than ever.

    So how can marketers ensure that their loan officers stand out? The answer is social media.

    Read this guidebook from Denim Social to learn how you can help your loan officers build strong relationships, stand out from the crowd and win more business using social media.

    Every Mortgage Marketer Should Ask Themselves

    Compliance is complicated, but don’t let it stop your lending team from making the most of social media. Think you’re ready to start social selling? Ask yourself these five questions!

    Download this guidebook to learn how marketers are using social media to:

    • Drive business with the lowest digital spend compared to traditional media
    • Position employees as thought-leaders while leveraging their collective reach of their social media presence
    • Ultimately, build trust with their communities and customers that translates to positive business results

    Read this guide if you’re asking yourself:

    • Is my social media policy current and comprehensive?
    • How do I ensure social media compliance during M&A?
    • What do I need to consider for direct messaging compliance?

    In this guide we will help you think about your all important social media policy and thoughtfully consider how changes in social media tech and even your bank’s structure may impact compliance.

    Download this guidebook to learn how marketers are using social media to:

    • Drive business with the lowest digital spend compared to traditional media
    • Position employees as thought-leaders while leveraging their collective reach of their social media presence
    • Ultimately, build trust with their communities and customers that translates to positive business results

    Every Financial Services Marketer Should Ask Themselves

    Compliance is complicated, but don’t let it stop your lending team from making the most of social media. Think you’re ready to start social selling? Ask yourself these five questions!

    Stronger Customer Relationships on Instagram

    Financial Services companies should be marketing and advertising on Instagram. We break down why, and help you create a strategy to reach new customers- while continuing to build trust in your brand.

    How 6 Financial Marketers Are Creating Value in Social Media

    Ever wonder what everyone else is doing in social media? We talked to six leading financial marketers about how they’re succeeding today and planning for the next big thing.

    Get their insights on strengthening your social strategies, unlocking the power of employee networks and creating next-level content that drives engagement.

    Download this guidebook to learn how 3 mortgage lenders are using social media to:

    • Position themselves in a place the community is already looking ... their social media
    • Empower loan officers to engage in local conversations
    • Turn their institution's loan officers into the voice of their brand
    • Build trust within the community

    Which roles do you fill when building your bank's marketing dream team? This guide will show you the following:

    • Who does what
    • The right structure to execute strategy
    • How compliance software can help

    Enjoy!

    Download this guidebook to learn how marketers are using social media to:

    • Drive business with the lowest digital spend compared to traditional media
    • Position employees as thought-leaders while leveraging their collective reach of their social media presence
    • Ultimately, build trust with their communities and customers that translates to positive business results

    ABA Study: The Current State of Social Media

    See what nearly 430 bank marketers had to say when asked questions such as:

  • Is it important to equip your sales personnel with social media accounts?
  • Does your bank measure the impact of your social media use?
  • COVID-19 & Bank Social Media

    Times are different and how you connect with customers and potential customers has changed drastically. In a socially distant world, learn to still build lasting relationships.

    Download and learn the guiding principles for using social media to serve both your customers and communities in the midst of a pandemic.

    Evolve Bank & Trust (“Evolve”) is an $700M+ asset institution with nearly 40 Home Loan Centers (HLC) and nearly 500 employees nationwide. See how Denim Social helped Evolve activate Home Loan Center Facebook pages over the course of just a few months.

    Download Here
    GUIDES

    Setting the Right Social Media Marketing Goals for Financial Services

    Designing and implementing social media strategies for financial institutions takes an investment of time, effort, and money. How can marketers tell whether the return is worth the investment?

    Many financial institutions look at vanity metrics to define their success on social media. Sure, this can show you how many likes, comments, and shares a post gets, but it doesn’t do much to prove a return on your investment. If you want to see real, measurable business results that go beyond farming and tracking likes and shares, you must focus on measuring and increasing conversion rates.

    Social media can be much more than just a brand-building tool for financial institutions. If you’re interested in moving to the next level of social media, take the following steps to convert leads and collect data to measure your success along the way:

    1. Woo followers with trust-building social content.

    The first step in driving conversions from social media is to get your audience’s attention with valuable content. Not every piece of content will drive conversions directly, but material that provides value to readers and establishes your expertise will build a solid foundation for your social media strategy.

    For example, local audience members would appreciate seeing content about how your financial institution is involved in the community. This is important content to share, but it doesn’t necessarily convert. Content that highlights your expertise and gets audiences interested in your services, however, is also an important part of your content foundation — and that material can provide a more direct line to conversion. A guidebook for first-time homebuyers, for instance, could spark a conversation between a follower and a loan officer.

    The key is to encourage your employees to share such content on their own social media accounts. Audiences will be twice as likely to click on a post shared by an employee than by the larger brand profile as they’ll relate more to a human face than a big brand. When employees become brand ambassadors on social media, they set a stronger foundation for trust and relationship-building down the line.

    2. Lead audiences to the next step in the digital journey with landing pages.

    Next, your social media strategy should go beyond catching interest to leading readers back to your website for further engagement.

    Build website landing pages to house the valuable content your associates highlight in their posts. For example, an employees’ social post could list one or two first steps in a guidebook for first-time homebuyers, then offer a link to the landing page to learn more. Once readers follow the link and land on your website, they can fill out a form with their name and email and get the guidebook download in return.

    Tools exist to help even marketers with no website-building experience craft landing pages with ease. You’ll want to create one for each of your target audiences for a targeted approach. For example, you may want to reach young adults with the homebuying guidebook and older ones with a retirement planning one. The intent is to offer readers valuable, relevant content they want and need — and to gather their information in the process. That way, the sales team can reach out to engage leads who have already demonstrated interest and seen value from your brand.

    3. Bring paid advertising into the fold to land in front of the right people.

    You can’t have an effective social media strategy without a foundation of organic social media, but you also can’t really grow your brand without investing in paid ads. Social platforms have changed their algorithms over the years to limit the visibility of branded posts. Paid social media advertising, however, allows you to target posts to specific audience segments and cut through the noise to deliver content that feels relevant and personalized. For example, by putting some money behind your associates’ posts about the first-time homebuyer guide, you could ensure that those posts reach young adults in the area.

    What’s more, you can retarget leads with paid social media advertising. If someone clicked a link from a social post to navigate to your landing page, downloaded the guidebook, but never responded to a follow-up email from the sales team, you could get ads in front of them on social to offer more valuable material and keep your brand top of mind. It can help you reengage audiences in the digital journey to get them one step closer to conversion.

    Social media has changed considerably in the past 10 years. Make no mistake: It’s still an incredibly important tool to have in your marketing stack. You just need to reframe your social media strategy so you can more plainly tell what’s working and why. By balancing your vanity and conversion metrics, as well as the processes used to bump them up, you’ll be well on your way to winning more customers.

    Download the Guide

    Thank you! Your submission has been received!
    Download Guide
    Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
    ALL GUIDES:

    BOK Financial is a financial services partner for consumers, businesses and wealth clients with more than 150 users on the Denim Social platform.

    In addition to building brand credibility and establishing loan officer expertise, Denim Social enables their mortgage loan officers to cultivate relationships in social media and organically source leads.

    As financial marketers look to the coming year, most are wondering, “what’s next?” While no one can say for sure, our team of experts here at Denim Social are keeping a pulse on what’s new in digital marketing for financial institutions on social media. This guide will not only educate you on the latest trends, but help you make the case for increased investment in social selling and digital marketing strategies at your institution.

    Whether you’re in banking, wealth management, insurance or mortgage, relationships are the bedrock of your business.

    Considering clients in these industries are handing over the keys to their personal kingdoms, it’s no surprise that trust and connection matter. That’s why successful sales strategies for these industries are focused on building long-term, trusted relationships.

    To truly unleash the potential of social, financial institutions need to use social media as a sales tool. It’s called social selling and it works.

    The power of social media is undeniable. The ability of banks to engage with and influence customers and prospects via interactive digital channels is an essential tool and a cornerstone of marketing. Gone are the days when it was “nice to have” a presence on platforms such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Instagram. Today, these pathways are helping banks to build relationships that were historically cultivated by tirelessly walking up and down Main Street, shaking hands and leaving behind business cards.

    In this case study by Denim Social and American Bankers Association, we take a look at how banks are using social media to ramp up digital engagement and build sales.

    As any marketer worth their salt will tell you, analytics should drive your social strategy. The key to success is understanding how to link social media efforts to ROI metrics. Read this guide to learn how to gain insights that matter, optimize your strategy and prove your social success.

    It’s no surprise that social media can help drive results for your mortgage business. In fact, the question for most marketers at mortgage lending institutions isn’t IF they should be doing more social media marketing - it’s HOW. Download to learn how to:

    • Scale your social selling program
    • Plan your content strategy
    • Train your loan officers

    AnnieMac is one of the fastest-growing mortgage loan providers in the U.S., serving clients in 42 states. Learn how Denim Social helped their team to streamline its brand’s social media strategy and activate social selling for hundreds of loan officers in just four months.

    Instant Download

    Find out how more than 400 financial institutions across asset classes, geographies, and more used social media in 2020 to effectively support their business objectives. We’ve also outlined key trends to inform your social media future.

    As mortgage demand surges to historic highs, home purchase and refinance markets remain hot. This is excellent news for loan officers, but it also means the environment is more competitive than ever.

    So how can marketers ensure that their loan officers stand out? The answer is social media.

    Read this guidebook from Denim Social to learn how you can help your loan officers build strong relationships, stand out from the crowd and win more business using social media.

    Every Mortgage Marketer Should Ask Themselves

    Compliance is complicated, but don’t let it stop your lending team from making the most of social media. Think you’re ready to start social selling? Ask yourself these five questions!

    Download this guidebook to learn how marketers are using social media to:

    • Drive business with the lowest digital spend compared to traditional media
    • Position employees as thought-leaders while leveraging their collective reach of their social media presence
    • Ultimately, build trust with their communities and customers that translates to positive business results

    Read this guide if you’re asking yourself:

    • Is my social media policy current and comprehensive?
    • How do I ensure social media compliance during M&A?
    • What do I need to consider for direct messaging compliance?

    In this guide we will help you think about your all important social media policy and thoughtfully consider how changes in social media tech and even your bank’s structure may impact compliance.

    Download this guidebook to learn how marketers are using social media to:

    • Drive business with the lowest digital spend compared to traditional media
    • Position employees as thought-leaders while leveraging their collective reach of their social media presence
    • Ultimately, build trust with their communities and customers that translates to positive business results

    Every Financial Services Marketer Should Ask Themselves

    Compliance is complicated, but don’t let it stop your lending team from making the most of social media. Think you’re ready to start social selling? Ask yourself these five questions!

    Stronger Customer Relationships on Instagram

    Financial Services companies should be marketing and advertising on Instagram. We break down why, and help you create a strategy to reach new customers- while continuing to build trust in your brand.

    How 6 Financial Marketers Are Creating Value in Social Media

    Ever wonder what everyone else is doing in social media? We talked to six leading financial marketers about how they’re succeeding today and planning for the next big thing.

    Get their insights on strengthening your social strategies, unlocking the power of employee networks and creating next-level content that drives engagement.

    Download this guidebook to learn how 3 mortgage lenders are using social media to:

    • Position themselves in a place the community is already looking ... their social media
    • Empower loan officers to engage in local conversations
    • Turn their institution's loan officers into the voice of their brand
    • Build trust within the community

    Which roles do you fill when building your bank's marketing dream team? This guide will show you the following:

    • Who does what
    • The right structure to execute strategy
    • How compliance software can help

    Enjoy!

    Download this guidebook to learn how marketers are using social media to:

    • Drive business with the lowest digital spend compared to traditional media
    • Position employees as thought-leaders while leveraging their collective reach of their social media presence
    • Ultimately, build trust with their communities and customers that translates to positive business results

    ABA Study: The Current State of Social Media

    See what nearly 430 bank marketers had to say when asked questions such as:

  • Is it important to equip your sales personnel with social media accounts?
  • Does your bank measure the impact of your social media use?
  • COVID-19 & Bank Social Media

    Times are different and how you connect with customers and potential customers has changed drastically. In a socially distant world, learn to still build lasting relationships.

    Download and learn the guiding principles for using social media to serve both your customers and communities in the midst of a pandemic.

    Evolve Bank & Trust (“Evolve”) is an $700M+ asset institution with nearly 40 Home Loan Centers (HLC) and nearly 500 employees nationwide. See how Denim Social helped Evolve activate Home Loan Center Facebook pages over the course of just a few months.

    Download Here

    RESOURCES

    NEWS
    June 8, 2021

    Setting the Right Social Media Marketing Goals for Financial Services

    Designing and implementing social media strategies for financial institutions takes an investment of time, effort, and money. How can marketers tell whether the return is worth the investment?

    Many financial institutions look at vanity metrics to define their success on social media. Sure, this can show you how many likes, comments, and shares a post gets, but it doesn’t do much to prove a return on your investment. If you want to see real, measurable business results that go beyond farming and tracking likes and shares, you must focus on measuring and increasing conversion rates.

    Social media can be much more than just a brand-building tool for financial institutions. If you’re interested in moving to the next level of social media, take the following steps to convert leads and collect data to measure your success along the way:

    1. Woo followers with trust-building social content.

    The first step in driving conversions from social media is to get your audience’s attention with valuable content. Not every piece of content will drive conversions directly, but material that provides value to readers and establishes your expertise will build a solid foundation for your social media strategy.

    For example, local audience members would appreciate seeing content about how your financial institution is involved in the community. This is important content to share, but it doesn’t necessarily convert. Content that highlights your expertise and gets audiences interested in your services, however, is also an important part of your content foundation — and that material can provide a more direct line to conversion. A guidebook for first-time homebuyers, for instance, could spark a conversation between a follower and a loan officer.

    The key is to encourage your employees to share such content on their own social media accounts. Audiences will be twice as likely to click on a post shared by an employee than by the larger brand profile as they’ll relate more to a human face than a big brand. When employees become brand ambassadors on social media, they set a stronger foundation for trust and relationship-building down the line.

    2. Lead audiences to the next step in the digital journey with landing pages.

    Next, your social media strategy should go beyond catching interest to leading readers back to your website for further engagement.

    Build website landing pages to house the valuable content your associates highlight in their posts. For example, an employees’ social post could list one or two first steps in a guidebook for first-time homebuyers, then offer a link to the landing page to learn more. Once readers follow the link and land on your website, they can fill out a form with their name and email and get the guidebook download in return.

    Tools exist to help even marketers with no website-building experience craft landing pages with ease. You’ll want to create one for each of your target audiences for a targeted approach. For example, you may want to reach young adults with the homebuying guidebook and older ones with a retirement planning one. The intent is to offer readers valuable, relevant content they want and need — and to gather their information in the process. That way, the sales team can reach out to engage leads who have already demonstrated interest and seen value from your brand.

    3. Bring paid advertising into the fold to land in front of the right people.

    You can’t have an effective social media strategy without a foundation of organic social media, but you also can’t really grow your brand without investing in paid ads. Social platforms have changed their algorithms over the years to limit the visibility of branded posts. Paid social media advertising, however, allows you to target posts to specific audience segments and cut through the noise to deliver content that feels relevant and personalized. For example, by putting some money behind your associates’ posts about the first-time homebuyer guide, you could ensure that those posts reach young adults in the area.

    What’s more, you can retarget leads with paid social media advertising. If someone clicked a link from a social post to navigate to your landing page, downloaded the guidebook, but never responded to a follow-up email from the sales team, you could get ads in front of them on social to offer more valuable material and keep your brand top of mind. It can help you reengage audiences in the digital journey to get them one step closer to conversion.

    Social media has changed considerably in the past 10 years. Make no mistake: It’s still an incredibly important tool to have in your marketing stack. You just need to reframe your social media strategy so you can more plainly tell what’s working and why. By balancing your vanity and conversion metrics, as well as the processes used to bump them up, you’ll be well on your way to winning more customers.

    Subscribe to our newsletter and get the latest sent to your inbox.
    Thank you for subscribing!
    Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
    OTHER NEWS:

    When trusted relationships are the bedrock of the industry, most smart financial services marketers see the opportunity in social media. A corporate social media presence is the norm, and many brands are investing in paid social media campaigns — but that’s only scratching the social media surface. For teams looking to transform social media into a sales tool, it’s time to start social selling.

    Social selling is so much more than encouraging your sellers to have a social presence. Having a company page on Facebook and a LinkedIn profile are table stakes. If Instagram, Twitter, or even TikTok make sense for your business, it’s important to be there, too. But social selling is so much more than just “being there.” Financial services marketers who embrace social selling empower their teams of intermediaries, such as agents and loan officers, to create lead-generating content that builds trust. Brands that get social selling right can expect to see a 45% increase in sales opportunities and a 51% higher chance of hitting sales goals, according to LinkedIn.

    So, why haven’t all financial services marketers launched social selling for their institutions yet? For one, many marketers are hesitant to jump into a process that involves monitoring and amplifying social media content for dozens, hundreds, or thousands of intermediaries. Even for seasoned marketers, it can seem intimidating. (Spoiler alert: With a platform like Denim Social, it’s much easier than it sounds!)

    Social selling also takes time. Organic social media growth ramps up over time, no matter how many social sellers a brand activates at once. But just because you might not see an immediate jump in KPIs doesn’t mean you’re not moving the needle. With patience and investment in the right social selling tools, social selling can transform your institution’s marketing strategy and results.

    You’re ready to launch social selling for your brand, but where do you get started? Check out these helpful tips from our team of experts at Denim Social:

    1. Identify internal social selling champions.

    Social selling needs widespread buy-in between marketing, sales, and other key departments. The most effective way to encourage buy-in is to get influential players in these groups on board with social selling. Explain to them how social selling works and its social media reach potential — and how to use the right social selling tools to protect compliance.

    By cultivating cheerleaders within your financial institution, these motivated individuals can be an example for their peers and showcase the value of social selling. The more buy-in you can get to your overall social selling program, the faster you’ll be able to demonstrate how valuable social selling is as a marketing strategy. Have patience and stay the course; your determination will pay off as you earn the support of more internal champions.

    2. Pick a solid social selling platform.

    Managing a social selling strategy could be your full-time job as a marketer, but it doesn’t have to be. The right social selling tech solution will help optimize your efforts without tossing another burden onto your team. We designed our platform to meet these needs with extensive compliance features, a library of preapproved content, and streamlined workflows that make publishing as easy as clicking a button. A social selling platform should make life easier for all its users; if it doesn’t, it’s not the right platform for you.

    When evaluating social selling tools, keep a few critical questions in mind: Does the vendor understand the nuances of the financial services industry? What kind of compliance coverage does the platform offer? How will you create content, and how will the platform help you do that? Asking these questions will point you in the right direction so that you can find a social selling platform that works best for your institution’s needs.

    3. Spend time training your social sellers and their support teams.

    The loan officers, agents, advisors, and other producers who will become your social selling team might or might not be familiar with how to be present on social to grow their business. Even if they’re active on social media personally, they might not understand the concept of social selling or how to make it work for them. It’s your job to teach them (you’re the expert, after all!).

    Keep in mind that social selling isn’t only the responsibility of your localized producers. It’s important to loop in anyone in your organization who supports your sales efforts. This means sales executives, regional sales leaders, and even marketing leadership. As part of your social selling launch, take the time to train your broader social selling support group, regardless of their department. 

    Broadened education and buy-in mean stickiness and support for the folks your organization is relying on to drive business at the local level: your true social sellers. Start with social channel basics and regular organic posting. Then, you can teach them how to feel comfortable generating their own content and engaging with their social networks. Does this mean all your employees need to become social media experts? Not even close. But a deeper understanding of social media in general lays the foundation for successful social selling as your teams get comfortable using it every day.

    At Denim Social, we’re passionate about helping your financial institution drive business results with social selling. Not only have we designed our platform to make administering a social selling program easy, but we also provide strategic support from day one, helping you educate and support your sales teams.

    Our platform offers several essential features that will help drive your ROI: (Hint: They can also help you implement the above three steps.)

    • Customized Onboarding and Team Training. Onboarding onto a new platform shouldn’t be a cookie-cutter process; every team and marketer is different. Tailoring our onboarding and training means that your team (and execs) know they’re getting a bespoke experience for the institution’s specific needs. When you’re getting started, Denim Social can help craft vital internal communication to encourage adoption, leaving no questions unanswered. Once you’ve got the basics down and your first champions are ready to dive in, you can check out our train-the-trainer sessions or our online academy to further grow your team’s expertise. From start to finish, you’ll have an invested partner.
    • Content-Rich, Customized Libraries. How will you keep up with content just for your social sellers? Denim Social works with you and UpContent to develop an extensive library of ready-to-use content for your social sellers’ unique needs and interests. Your teams will always have something to say on social, keeping them top of mind with their networks — with the peace of mind of staying compliant.
    • Scalable Paid Advertising. Though the foundation of your social selling strategy starts with empowering your intermediaries with organic social content, the most robust social selling programs also integrate localized paid advertising. Although the organic content you cultivate through your individual champions will work to add nuance and humanity to your brand, putting your ad dollars behind your producers will reach consumers looking to connect with real, local humans who can guide them through their next financial decisions. We recommend that marketers drive this side of the social selling strategy, and our platform makes it easy. With Denim Social, one marketer can launch and scale tailor-made paid social campaigns delivered on behalf of your local producers to their local communities.
    • Compliance-Focused Features. When you work in financial services marketing, you’re guided by numerous rules, regulations, and laws. Denim Social is engineered to find and flag compliance-related issues before any content goes live. This robust filtering proactively recognizes potential problems so you can sleep better at night.

    As part of our compliance-driven culture, our platform provides continuous compliance training through constant feedback. As your team notices which posts are approved or unapproved, they’ll gain valuable insights into the nuances of social media compliance for the industry. Plus, your team can rely on the curated, preapproved content within your Denim Social library, so you can be sure everything posted is compliant (and compelling). An added upside to our compliance feature is that our social selling platform tracks and records all published content, so it can be used for audits whenever you need it.

    Are you curious and looking to level up your digital marketing strategy? Or maybe you’re ready to dive in head-first and experience the benefits of social selling firsthand? Either way, social selling is a great way to get started empowering your team and increasing your reach.

    Check out Denim Social’s comprehensive social selling guide to learn more!

    As a financial marketer, you know that the past 12 months have been a prime time for social selling. Social media usage has been on trajectory to rise 7.8% in 2022, with steady growth expected to continue over the next five years. This growth is fueled by consumers increasingly consulting social media for help making decisions — a habit that offers big opportunities for financial institutions.

    As the new year rapidly approaches, it’s a great time to plan your future social selling strategies with the latest social media trends in mind. Wondering what’s popular on social networks? How should trends inform your social selling strategy in the coming year? Here’s what you need to know as you plan for 2023 and beyond:

    1. Video content is taking over.

    Videos, particularly shorter clips, are having a major moment on YouTube, TikTok, and Instagram Reels. Social users are increasingly consuming short-form (call it “snackable”) content, even on legacy social networks. For example, bite-sized videos earned 57% of YouTube views in the second quarter of 2022, versus just 21% the year before.

    Many of these videos attract viewers by seamlessly blending education and entertainment. Financial concepts are perfect for the “edutainment” treatment, too. Think about it: With more than 89% of TikTok users actively trying to learn more about finance, it only makes sense to add financial video “edutainment” into your social selling strategy.

    That said, not every social selling post needs to contain a video, and not every video needs to be a highly produced affair. Easy-to-consume content is the name of the game, so think short and concise. Quick, pithy videos such as selfie commentaries or quick tips from your social sellers can make your content feel more authentic. No matter what video style you pursue, short clips will stop scrollers and make them more likely to engage with your intermediaries’ posts.

    2. Financial advice influencer culture opens up social selling opportunities.

    Social media probably seems like the last place most people would turn to for advice about money, yet finance-focused influencers are attracting lots of interest, particularly from younger social media consumers. Gen Zers are five times likelier than older Millennials and Generation Xers to get their money management suggestions on social media. With consumers seeking answers to their business and personal questions via online influencer personalities, you can’t afford not to put your intermediaries on social media to engage these audiences thirsty for (and often unable to find) credible information.

    If you haven’t already, plan to empower your producers (agents, loan officers, financial advisors, and other rock stars at your organization) to share their expert advice on social media. When they do, your social sellers’ audiences can build up their financial literacy with insights from qualified professionals. Those prospects’ and customers’ lives will improve, and their loyalty will grow.

    Note that your social selling team members don’t have to become superstar influencers for this strategy to work, either. Micro-influencers in their communities also gain plenty of loyalty — and sales as a result. Because social algorithms favor individuals over brands, it’s time to get more of your brand representatives to highlight their expertise on social channels.

    3. Social networks as search engines enhances discoverability.

    Social is the new search engine. Almost 40% of Generation Z searchers go to apps such as Instagram and TikTok first for search capabilities. In other words, they bypass Google in favor of social networks. That’s huge. And we at Denim Social think this online behavior is sure to catch on across generations. We also think the best way to make use of this trend is to have social sellers active on social media. When more of your employees are on social networks, you’re more discoverable.

    Another surefire way to take advantage of the social search trend is to make sure your social selling strategies include both organic and paid tactics. When organic and paid elements work together, you can be where consumers need you at the time they need you.

    Otherwise, optimizing for search on social isn’t much different from any other SEO work you’ve encountered. A fast way to enhance the discoverability of social selling copy is to ensure that it incorporates strategic hashtags, including nods to trending topics. Remember, it’s fine for social posts to include numerous hashtags, as long as they all make sense. SEO keywords can also fit nicely into social selling content and ad copy, just as they do in website copy and blog posts. All that optimization drives the social media search engine, ensuring users find your content when they’re seeking information that could lead them to decisions.

    Social media has changed the game for marketing and has made person-to-person communication (and selling!) an essential strategy. As with any social media strategy, being up to date on trends is critical for social selling success. Guiding your intermediaries to add short videos, credible advice, and search-boosting features to content will strengthen your social selling strategy for 2023.

    A financial conversation is already happening online, and your institution needs to be part of it. It’s time to launch a social selling program if you haven’t already. And if you have, let these trends be a clear sign that it’s time to expand your efforts. People are choosing to work with financial professionals they find on social media, and your intermediaries can meet them there. Want more insider knowledge about applying social selling techniques? Download our exclusive 2023 Denim Social Trend Report today.

    Smart financial marketers know social media and social selling are essential  to effectively reach and build trust with today’s consumers. But how does your digital marketing strategy measure up against competitors?

    Denim Social is here to help. We collected social media data from 177 institutions across banking, mortgage, wealth management and insurance to help you get the pulse on the social media performance. Take a look and see how your institution stacks up.

    Ready to learn how you can adopt these trends? Book a demo to learn more.

    People buy from people. That fundamental truth is the cornerstone of the insurance industry and is holding true even as the insurance value chain becomes more and more digital. But in a world where customers increasingly avoid in-person interactions — McKinsey’s 2020 U.S. Insurance Agent Survey saw a 65% drop in face-to-face conversations in 2020, with a slow recovery — how do agents adjust? The answer is to meet customers where they are - online.

    Insurance professionals likely view social media as a necessary evil, but social media can be a powerful sales tool, putting agents right in the path of their clients and prospects. It’s more than just posting content into a digital void; it’s taking what agents have done for decades to build their business and bringing it to life within the social media landscape. Consider this: GWI research suggests online consumers around the globe spend almost 2.5 hours scrolling through social sites daily.

    Putting energy into social media as a sales tool means attracting those eyes and winning more chances to interact with prospects and customers. But where do you start? Here are a few things to consider before leaning into social selling.

    1. Learn exactly what social selling is (and isn’t)

    Social selling is using social media to showcase thought leadership and industry expertise, build relationships and, ultimately, connect with new prospects while maintaining trust with existing ones. But a social selling strategy requires much more than having a Twitter account; it requires the same attention as any sales methods do. It’s taking social beyond simply posting regularly. It’s using social as a connection point to identify life events and points of connection with your community. And the good news is, you should see the returns. LinkedIn’s Social Selling data notes that 78% of social sellers outshine their peers who aren’t using social media as a sales tool.

    1. Take stock of your social media accounts

    If you hope to capitalize on social selling, you must first take stock of your existing social media accounts and look for opportunities to strengthen your overall social presence.

    Whichever social channel mix you’ve decided is right for your business (it’s OK not to be on every social platform!), you always want to make sure your brand is consistent and robust across each channel. That sounds easy, but there are a few things to consider to ensure that your identity is clear and consistent:

    • Profile images: Whether it’s a professionally taken photo, a well-lit high-resolution image taken on a smartphone or your company logo, make sure your profile images reflect how you and your company look today. (For example: Don’t use your headshot from 15 years ago.)
    • Cover images: Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter all have a space for a cover or background image. Be sure you have a cover image that is consistent with your brand and that you have the rights to use that image.
    • “About” sections: Today’s consumers use social media for information searches like they use Google, so your bios and “about” sections pages are more important than ever. Sections can vary across social channels, but your information should be accurate and reflect your business on each channel. Pay special attention to your business description, location information and hours of operation.

    Rather than jump right into the heavy stuff, it’s important to get these social media ducks in a row first.

    1. Make a plan for posting, engaging and amplifying.

    After your social accounts are up to speed, it’s important to have a plan. Regularly posting content is only the foundation of social selling, but it will help keep you top of mind with your followers and give you a place to interact with them. It also sets you up well when you’re ready to start putting money behind your posts with paid social advertising.

    Beyond posting, it’s important to keep an eye on those who interact with your posts. Comment back, connect with them or, better yet, give them a call. Social selling really comes to life when you can weave social into your everyday sales practices. Either way, prioritize social just as you would other crucial facets of your business. Post regularly and have a plan for responding and engaging with your existing and potential clients. Then turn those engagements into sales opportunities.

    1. Leverage your resources.

    You’re not the only one flexing your social selling muscles, so look to others – even insights from competitors - for help. A good way to begin is to look at the social accounts of others in and out of your sector. What are they writing about? What posts seem to engage followers? How are they branding themselves to be trustworthy experts? Use the information you gather to help you plan your own social selling and content strategy.

    The question shouldn’t be if you should start social selling, it’s when. Your existing and potential clients are there, waiting for you. You only must give social selling the time and energy it deserves. As someone in a profession built around risk, you’ll find that social selling is a safe bet.

    This article was originally published in Insurance Newsnet.

    In today’s origination and refi environment, most mortgage loan officers are finding it’s no longer fish in a barrel. That means every loan officer needs to consider their competitive edge. And when bargain-basement rates are no longer the decision driver for prospects, relationships matter more than ever.

    Everyone knows a successful sales strategy is focused on building long-term, trusted relationships, but today, that means building relationships online. Social media has long been regarded as a brand builder, but the real power of social is using it as a sales tool. It’s called social selling and it works.

    Social selling is just what it sounds like: using social media to sell a product or service. It’s leveraging social to build personal relationships, showcase thought leadership, engage with prospects, interact with existing customers, and ultimately build trust and rapport that will eventually lead to deals.

    An active social selling strategy can not only help build ongoing relationships, but keep you top of mind with contacts when opportunities open up – and in this rate environment, that can be short-lived.

    Social selling requires continual care and management, but it’s worth the investment of time, and effort when you’re using social to drive business results. A daily social selling routine helps loan officers in so many ways and managing a program doesn’t have to be overwhelming. Here’s where to start:

    Optimize Your Profile

    Before you even get to posting, it’s important to take a look at your profiles to ensure your brand is consistent across channels. Ensure you have a current and easily recognizable profile picture. If you haven’t already, upload a cover image and update the about section to be your descriptions, location and hours are current.

    Post Meaningful and Relevant Content

    It’s not only important for you to be posting regularly, you need to be posting with purpose. Your social profiles should be an extension of who you are in real life. Authenticity always wins in social media.

    There is no magic formula for how often you should post, but consistency is key. Successful social selling programs offer a variety of organic content. The mix looks different for every loan officer, but commonly a healthy and informed mix includes brand, industry and most importantly, personal/community content.

    Interact with the Community

    Social media is a two-way conversation and that means you need to be interacting with followers. In other words, don’t post and ghost. Social selling is about listening, responding and engaging. It’s a conversation, so you should be promptly responding to comments and direct messages, showing connections that their inquiries and concerns matter.

    When every deal matters, so does every relationship. If you’re looking to build trust and connection with customers and prospects alike, make sure your profiles are up to date, post regularly and interact with your followers. A social selling strategy can help you make the most of social media opportunities in a competitive environment.

    This article was originally published in MBA Newslink.

    The insurance industry is built on — and amazing at! — assessing risk. But the industry’s risk aversion has put insurance marketers between a rock and a hard place. On the one hand, modern customer expectations mean agents need to leverage their relationship-building skills to gain ground online. On the other, unfamiliarity and fears about compliance are driving slow social selling adoption across the industry. While the concept may seem novel to some insurance leaders, that doesn't mean their competition is standing on the sidelines. After all, rival carriers aren’t twiddling their thumbs; many are jumping headfirst into social selling strategies and generating the new business to show for it.

    The good news is that adopting social selling doesn’t mean the industry has to reinvent the wheel. Rather, it should feel natural because this kind of digital communication is simply an extension of what agents are already doing. Instead of viewing digital marketing and social selling as an entirely new strategy, remember that it’s built on the same bread-and-butter relationship skills that trusted insurance advisors have always used with their customers. Insurance leaders must acknowledge social media as a sales channel, just like cold calling and in-person meetings, and must integrate social selling into the fabric of their organizations.

    How to Advocate for Social Selling

    Social media isn’t going anywhere. It’s where consumers are interacting with each other, looking for advice, and learning new things. This means intermediaries have to be there, too. Insurance agents need to reach their clients and prospects alike on social media, and the carriers and agencies they’re part of can help.

    With this in mind, insurance marketers and leaders must advocate for social selling throughout the organization. And everyone has a role to play. While marketers will stay busy coordinating paid ad campaigns to reach new target audiences and managing the branded social media, agents and other representatives of the brand must be on board as well: They need to be posting, liking, and replying to build relationships and bring a human touch to the broader social media strategy. Getting this buy-in means bridging the gap between sales and marketing — and educating them on why social selling works. If you're ready to sell-in social selling, here are four ways to get started:

    1. Get Everybody on the Same Page

    While some marketers may already be comfortable with the concept, social selling is still a recent marketing innovation for the insurance industry. Marketers need to get up to speed on strategy and execution, while also educating the organization (especially intermediaries — have we mentioned how important they are?).

    Start by defining social selling. This is our shorthand definition:

    Social selling is using social media to sell a product or service. It’s using social to:

    · Showcase thought leadership

    · Engage with potential customers

    · Interact with existing customers

    · Build trust and relationships

    Sounds pretty straightforward, right? While the execution can be trickier — think balancing paid and organic advertising, tracking analytics to calculate ROI, and overseeing the social media accounts of all the intermediaries — starting simple helps ease everyone into the process. This is especially important for advisors with limited social media experience. Lead with empathy to help them adjust to the new face of insurance marketing.

    2. Speak Their Language — With Stats to Back You Up

    Intermediaries want to build relationships and drive results — and social selling can help them do it — but only if they understand its potential. Highlight the value social selling has for both the company and individual intermediaries. Thankfully, this is one of the easier parts of selling social selling: The stats can do all the heavy lifting.

    Gather good information from trustworthy sources. If you’re going to be persuasive, you have to paint the picture of what social selling can do. Some of our favorite data comes from LinkedIn. Sales reps scoring higher on LinkedIn’s Social Selling Index experience:

    · 45% more sales opportunities

    · 51% higher likelihood to hit quotas

    · 78% outselling peers who don’t use social media

    And don’t be afraid to share the success you’ve had with brand social media, too. Brand social media and intermediary social selling, paid social ads, and organic social media content: All of these are chapters in the greater narrative of successful digital marketing strategies.

    3. Seriously, Bring Up the Data

    Raw numbers are well and good, but case studies marry data and narrative in a uniquely compelling way. Countless other industries have had success with social selling, and insurance needs to pay attention. Share these stories about what social selling has accomplished for so many other businesses. The housing industry, for one, has been particularly astute with social selling in recent years, especially when it comes to mortgage lending.

    In addition to formal case studies, bring the concept to life with experiences anyone can understand or has likely seen in their personal social media feeds. Local real estate agents are great examples of an industry that’s exemplary at utilizing social selling tools. Instead of starting from scratch, look to adjacent regulated industries to guide the way.

    4. Create a Culture of Q&As

    Don’t assume leaders know that social media is a sales channel — but also, don’t talk down to them when explaining the state of digital marketing. This means creating safe spaces where pros can ask questions (and not feel silly). Have a coffee; grab lunch. Give someone permission to be vulnerable and learn. Their aversion is likely rooted in misunderstanding. And remember, more experienced professionals may never have used social media for anything other than personal sharing. Empathy is your best friend. Walking alongside leaders and agents as they dip their feet into social selling will be so much more effective than talking down to them from the podium of knowledge. Building a strong foundation of understanding and a desire to learn will go a long way toward activating a social selling strategy.

    Social media marketing for insurance intermediaries may seem like a radical concept, but it’s more radical to not be using social as a sales tool. Sure, it may be new and feel risky, but educating the team and arming them with resources will make social selling feel not only prudent but necessary. To learn more about how social selling can help you reach your audience, request a demo today.

    Connect & Convert on Social

    Successfully scale conversion optimized campaigns across all social media channels with built-in compliance, publishing tools, and more.
    Book a Demo

    RESOURCES

    VISION
    June 8, 2021

    Setting the Right Social Media Marketing Goals for Financial Services

    No items found.

    Designing and implementing social media strategies for financial institutions takes an investment of time, effort, and money. How can marketers tell whether the return is worth the investment?

    Many financial institutions look at vanity metrics to define their success on social media. Sure, this can show you how many likes, comments, and shares a post gets, but it doesn’t do much to prove a return on your investment. If you want to see real, measurable business results that go beyond farming and tracking likes and shares, you must focus on measuring and increasing conversion rates.

    Social media can be much more than just a brand-building tool for financial institutions. If you’re interested in moving to the next level of social media, take the following steps to convert leads and collect data to measure your success along the way:

    1. Woo followers with trust-building social content.

    The first step in driving conversions from social media is to get your audience’s attention with valuable content. Not every piece of content will drive conversions directly, but material that provides value to readers and establishes your expertise will build a solid foundation for your social media strategy.

    For example, local audience members would appreciate seeing content about how your financial institution is involved in the community. This is important content to share, but it doesn’t necessarily convert. Content that highlights your expertise and gets audiences interested in your services, however, is also an important part of your content foundation — and that material can provide a more direct line to conversion. A guidebook for first-time homebuyers, for instance, could spark a conversation between a follower and a loan officer.

    The key is to encourage your employees to share such content on their own social media accounts. Audiences will be twice as likely to click on a post shared by an employee than by the larger brand profile as they’ll relate more to a human face than a big brand. When employees become brand ambassadors on social media, they set a stronger foundation for trust and relationship-building down the line.

    2. Lead audiences to the next step in the digital journey with landing pages.

    Next, your social media strategy should go beyond catching interest to leading readers back to your website for further engagement.

    Build website landing pages to house the valuable content your associates highlight in their posts. For example, an employees’ social post could list one or two first steps in a guidebook for first-time homebuyers, then offer a link to the landing page to learn more. Once readers follow the link and land on your website, they can fill out a form with their name and email and get the guidebook download in return.

    Tools exist to help even marketers with no website-building experience craft landing pages with ease. You’ll want to create one for each of your target audiences for a targeted approach. For example, you may want to reach young adults with the homebuying guidebook and older ones with a retirement planning one. The intent is to offer readers valuable, relevant content they want and need — and to gather their information in the process. That way, the sales team can reach out to engage leads who have already demonstrated interest and seen value from your brand.

    3. Bring paid advertising into the fold to land in front of the right people.

    You can’t have an effective social media strategy without a foundation of organic social media, but you also can’t really grow your brand without investing in paid ads. Social platforms have changed their algorithms over the years to limit the visibility of branded posts. Paid social media advertising, however, allows you to target posts to specific audience segments and cut through the noise to deliver content that feels relevant and personalized. For example, by putting some money behind your associates’ posts about the first-time homebuyer guide, you could ensure that those posts reach young adults in the area.

    What’s more, you can retarget leads with paid social media advertising. If someone clicked a link from a social post to navigate to your landing page, downloaded the guidebook, but never responded to a follow-up email from the sales team, you could get ads in front of them on social to offer more valuable material and keep your brand top of mind. It can help you reengage audiences in the digital journey to get them one step closer to conversion.

    Social media has changed considerably in the past 10 years. Make no mistake: It’s still an incredibly important tool to have in your marketing stack. You just need to reframe your social media strategy so you can more plainly tell what’s working and why. By balancing your vanity and conversion metrics, as well as the processes used to bump them up, you’ll be well on your way to winning more customers.

    Subscribe to our newsletter and get the latest sent to your inbox.
    Thank you for subscribing!
    Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
    SIMILAR POSTS:

    For many financial marketers and social sellers, Twitter is something of an enigma. It has a different format and structure than other popular social media networks, so it can be difficult to create the right social selling strategy. 

    However, it is still a great place to connect with customers and share thought leadership, service offerings, and authentic, real-time content. 

    Follow these Twitter best practices to drive results and show up in a meaningful way. 

    Need more social media content? Check out our guidebook on social media trends for financial services.

    Customer relationship-building is one of the greatest value drivers for insurance agents. A benchmark analysis from McKinsey & Co. found agents with deeper customer relationships have higher product density than those lacking in relationships — often cross-selling three or more products per customer.

    With that in mind, it’s essential that agents understand how to best leverage their humanity and personality to truly connect with their audiences. In today’s age, this extends to how agents present themselves and connect online.

    When prospective clients meet an agent for the first time, they’re asking themselves, “Is this person likable? Can I trust them?” Clients want to feel an authentic connection that gives them peace of mind and assures them that someone has their best interests at heart.

    This desire for connection isn’t limited to the insurance industry. In fact, 88% of consumers say that authenticity is a key factor when deciding the brands they like and support, and that trust is vitally important to entering working relationships. That desire for trust grows exponentially when it comes to insurance sales because the business is built around protecting clients’ futures.

    Insurance agents have a head start on this — their businesses have always been rooted in authenticity. But as digital transformation in the insurance industry continues, it’s more important than ever that agents assert themselves through authenticity on social media. It’s no different from what agents and other insurance professionals have been doing in person for years. It’s about conveying expertise, building trust, and showcasing industry knowledge — except now it’s within the digital universe. Social media provides a new platform for staying top of mind with customers and prospects alike.

    So, how should agents be more authentic on social media? Same as they would offline — with relationships.

    Good selling starts with genuinely listening to clients and being authentic, no matter what. Insurance agents are there to identify clients’ life needs and build a solution to protect them against loss. They must genuinely care about clients’ needs to find the right solutions and demonstrate that level of care to earn trust.

    Here’s how agents can bring that energy to social media:

    View social media as an opportunity to provide value. Marketers and agents alike already know that authenticity is important to customer acquisition. That same authenticity should show up in social media activity.

    Agents should still be themselves, just on digital channels. After all, in the insurance business, agents are selling a promise that a consumer may or may not ever see delivery on. If the client never has an accident, they’ll never make a claim.

    This means a lot of time can pass between a point of sale and delivery of promise.

    With the rise of social media, however, there is a growing opportunity to deliver value in the long term. Whether it’s sharing thought-leadership articles, checking in with clients on social media, or providing digital tools to help educate clients, the digital landscape provides ample opportunity to reinforce proof of agent value on an ongoing basis. Including both paid and organic social media marketing for insurance agents in the mix of sales practices is critical.

    This won’t replace traditional tools like phone, email and in-person meetings, but having a mix of organic and paid content alongside them will complement other relationship-building efforts, keep agents top of mind, and continually provide value to clients and prospects.

    Lean into the power of real-life experience. There’s a good chance that agents live and work in the communities they serve. Agents should use that advantage with prospective clients when building their authentic brands. Showing on social media what’s happening in their communities and their offices will help foster a sense of belonging and drive interest among followers.

    Need more marketing ideas for insurance agents? Look to everyday experiences. If an agent runs into someone at a local event, they should take a selfie and tag the person on Instagram, Facebook or LinkedIn. If a client drops off cookies, the agent should post a photo and a heartfelt message about what it meant to the team. Social media followers will connect with those real-life moments far more than they would with a branded post.

    Embrace storytelling. Too often, social media marketing for insurance agents consists only of market statistics or limited-time promotions. While this type of content can absolutely be useful and helpful, it’s not enough on its own. Think about the brands you follow: Would statistics and discounts be enough to get you engaged?

    Social media is about creating a narrative, not just posting facts or promotions.

    Agents should share the true picture of what it’s been like to grow a practice. Tell client stories about how they’ve benefited from your insurance products (with permission and privacy in mind, of course). When agents share authentically, they build trust with clients and prospects.

    Be themselves. If agents are only professional and stuffy, audiences won’t connect. Agents and marketers alike shouldn’t be afraid to let a little personality shine through on social media. Thought leadership can create credibility and demonstrate expertise, and it’s always better received when served up by a real-life person.

    That’s what social selling is all about.

    Posting is only one part of the strategy. Agents should also comment on and engage with clients’ posts as appropriate. Two-way communication is critical to building authenticity. Think about it as if you were having an in-person conversation; there would be plenty of back-and-forth throughout the discussion. Did a client become a grandparent? Their agent should congratulate them. Social selling is all about creating conversation, just like in real life.

    Engagement provides the added benefit of personalization. Customers don’t want to feel like marketing collateral. When agents engage with them honestly and authentically, they’re well on their way to creating deep, lasting consumer relationships.

    Building authenticity through social media is similar in principle to building authenticity in real life; it’s just using a different medium to do so. When intermediaries share personal stories and helpful content with clients in a way that reflects their true personalities, they’ll build lasting relationships both online and offline that will serve as the foundation of future sales.

    *This article was originally published in Insurance Journal.

    Instagram is a great way for financial institutions to showcase their authenticity and highlight the human side of the business, but have you incorporated best practices into your social selling strategy?

    There’s no doubt that this highly visual social media network is a great place to reach audiences and connect with customers, especially for social sellers like insurance agents, mortgage loan officers, and financial advisors. 

    As you plan content and interact with followers, be sure to follow these best practices for a better Instagram marketing strategy.

    Need more Instagram inspiration? Download our guidebook, Stronger Customer Relationships on Instagram.

    Algorithm updates from nearly every social media network — including Twitter, TikTok, and Instagram — have frustrated their share of users over the years, consumers included. If you fall into that group, it’s time to make peace with them. Social media algorithm changes don’t have to ruin your day — or your organic reach. You just have to know how to peacefully coexist with them as a digital marketer.

    We all have to accept and expect that social media networks will change their algorithms over time. Whether the latest LinkedIn update is messing with your reach or Apple iOS update is suddenly upending your paid advertising strategy, you must be ready to pivot and adapt. Sure, it’s frustrating to see your Facebook reach drop by 5% practically overnight, even if your marketing peers are in the same boat. But it’s important to remember that even with algorithm changes, integrated digital strategies provide incredible opportunities to reach the right target audiences at the right time with the right messages— all to drive business results.

     With an attitude of willingness to listen to the data, your team can navigate changes and optimize your strategies accordingly. Knowledge is power when it comes to optimizing the algorithm. Understanding social network changes is also an important consideration as you socialize results internally and advocate for a budget for your marketing efforts. You must be able to pinpoint how and when algorithmic changes impacted your results, so you can prove that it’s not a failure of your strategy but rather an opportunity to evolve.

    Ready to overcome today’s algorithm obstacles? Try these strategies:

    1. Drive greater reach and stronger engagement with social selling.

    When algorithm changes tank your brand’s organic social media reach and engagement, don’t waste time wishing you could turn back the clock. Take updates as a sign (and one of many!) that your institution should be empowering your intermediaries (think agents, loan officers, advisors, etc.) through social selling. The practice of social selling is just as it sounds: Using social media to sell a product or service. But social selling starts with relationship building, showcasing thought leadership, and building trust on social media through the voices of the folks driving business in their local communities.

    Social selling can simultaneously foster loyalty, humanize your brand, and supercharge your metrics in the face of algorithmic headwinds. Why? Employees’ social media accounts have 10 times the reach and drive double the engagement compared to their employers’ brand pages. Plus, sales reps who regularly share content are 57% more likely to generate leads. Social media networks prioritize content from individuals versus brands so that social selling can help your team bust through algorithmic barriers.

    2. Complement organic social selling with paid social advertising.

    All those algorithm changes might be causing engagement headaches. The cure is more straightforward than you might have assumed: paid social advertising. Paid social media advertisements, like in a PPC campaign, are terrific for funneling leads back to your landing pages. Once your ads are in place, you can target the audiences that matter most to your social sellers.

    By doubling up on organic and paid marketing tactics, you get a double-whammy effect that mitigates social media algorithm updates. Organic posts create a solid foundation for your social sellers, building credibility and reaching people who already follow your social sellers. Paid social media ads enable your team to strategically engage new audiences, filling your sales pipeline. Organic and paid work hand in hand to help your team break through on social.

    3. Make the most of every social media post.

    Every. Post. Counts. Although not every single thing you share on social will get the engagement you hoped for, being intentional and authentic is key. There are also three things you can do to make the most of each post that will play nice with algorithms, too:

    • First, include an image whenever you can. Social media posts with images often get more engagement. 
    • Second, schedule posts to publish at the ideal time for your desired audience. (Our team can tell you more about this!) 
    • Third, craft copy that encourages two-way communication, such as asking open-ended questions, soliciting feedback, or publishing polls. Thought-provoking copy encourages comments, and that’s where social selling really comes to life!

    Don’t forget that social posts should be the beginning of a digital journey for your followers. Not every post needs to include a direct call to action, but thoughtfully linking your followers to meaningful resources eventually paves the way for conversions. Whether it’s organic or paid, a social post can open the door to a digital journey that is beneficial for the customer and the intermediary looking to build that relationship.

    Algorithm updates might keep you on your toes, but they don’t have to ruin your marketing outcomes. You’ve got this! If you’re interested in further education about how organic and paid social work together, you’ll appreciate reading “How to Marry Organic and Paid Social Media Advertising Strategies.”

    Denim Social, a leading provider of social selling software for the mortgage industry, is proud to announce it has joined The Mortgage Collaborative. Together, the two organizations will educate mortgage lenders on the power of social selling and help them elevate their social selling programs to increase mortgage loan officer success. 

    The Mortgage Collaborative empowers mortgage lenders across the country with better financial execution, reduced costs, enhanced expertise and improved compliance. As consumer behavior shifts online and in a highly competitive marketplace, The Mortgage Collaborative also helps members reach and access prospective clients. 

    “Social selling is an essential tool for today’s mortgage lenders,” said Tom Gallucci, Senior Vice President of Business Development at The Mortgage Collaborative. “Partners like Denim Social will help our members build trust online, stay compliant and, most importantly, close more deals.”

    Members of The Mortgage Collaborative and customers of Denim Social will have access to member only pricing, resources and training. 

    “We’re excited to be a part of The Mortgage Collaborative – an organization that so many of our customers gain great value from already. We’re looking forward to collaborating with TMC on special content and resources, as well as forging deeper connections with members,” said Doug Wilber, CEO of Denim Social. 

    Click here to learn more about Denim Social and the Mortgage Collaborative’s partnership.

    Is your institution following  Facebook best practices?

    As the long-standing most popular social network, using Facebook is an important way for financial marketers and social sellers to reach a wide audience with timely content. Taking time to check for accuracy, updates, and more will go a long way in putting your best social selling  foot forward.

    Don’t forget these Facebook best practices as you build out a social selling program. 

    Want more social media ideas? Download our guidebook, Social Media Trends for Financial Institutions.

    Connect & Convert on Social

    Successfully scale conversion optimized campaigns across all social media channels with built-in compliance, publishing tools, and more.
    Book a Demo

    Connect & Convert on Social

    Successfully scale conversion optimized campaigns across all social media channels with built-in compliance, publishing tools, and more.
    Book a Demo

    Connect & Convert on Social

    Successfully scale conversion optimized campaigns across all social media channels with built-in compliance, publishing tools, and more.
    Book a Demo